CPR

Why Perform CPR

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CPR is performed to prevent brain damage and death when a person is in

cardiac arrest. The heart may stop because of heart disease, a motor

vehicle accident, drowning, or choking.

 

Anyone who has lost consciousness may need CPR. Also, confusion,

weakness, and chest pain may signal that cardiac arrest is about to occur

and that CPR may be needed.

 

After the heart stops, even a few minutes’ delay in starting CPR can mean

the difference between life and death.

 

Performing CPR supports the heart and brain with oxygen until medical

help arrives.

 

Instructional purposes only not for resale. Content cited from:

Jones, Shirley A. ACLS, CPR & PALS. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company, March 25, 2014. Print.

Last Updated on Sunday, 02 November 2014 23:39

CPR Overview

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Every day around the world, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is used in and

out of the hospital to save lives. CPR has saved the lives of children who are

drowning or have swallowed something accidentally, as well as those of adults

suffering from a heart attack.

 

CPR encompasses a level of medical care that revives, resuscitates, or sustains

a person who is in cardiac or respiratory arrest. The person’s heartbeat

and breathing may be compromised or stopped by a heart attack, drowning,

choking, or other emergency. Healthcare personnel learn how to recognize

emergencies, such as sudden cardiac arrest, and know how to respond. Skills

taught in this tab include performing CPR and relieving choking (foreign-body

airway obstruction) in all ages: adult, child, and infant. Also included are use of

a bag-mask device and an automated external defi brillator (AED).

The adult and pediatric chains of survival ensure the proper steps for

resuscitation.

 

Adult Chain of Survival

Immediate recognition of cardiac or respiratory arrest with early access to

the emergency medical response team

Early CPR

Early defi brillation

Early access to advanced medical care

Effective post-resuscitation care

 

Pediatric Chain of Survival

Prevention of cardiac or respiratory arrest

Early CPR

Early access to the emergency medical response team

Early access to advanced medical care

Effective post-resuscitation care

 

Instructional purposes only not for resale. Content cited from:
Jones, Shirley A. ACLS, CPR & PALS. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company, March 25, 2014. Print.
Last Updated on Sunday, 02 November 2014 23:44
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